Helpline

NANE help line

For victims of domestic and sexual violence and their supporters

+36 80 505 101 (within Hungary)
+36 1 267 4900 (from abroad)

 

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 6-10 PM, Wednesday 12-2 PM
 

NANE HELPLINE

06-80-505-101

For domestic & sexual violence victims and their supporters

Available free of charge and can be called anonymously on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays, between 6 – 10 pm, and on Wednesdays between 12 – 2 pm.

Ask for help by email: segelylevel@nane.hu

English language operators might be available, please check with us by email before calling

About the NANE helpline

The helpline’s target group includes the victims of gender-based violence and of the connected issues of child abuse, sexual violence, and incest. We also welcome calls by those close to the victims, people who want to help, as well as trained professionals. For the most part, the fundamental values of the helpline are the same as The Association’s General Principles.

The NANE helpline, operating since February 1994, is called almost 1,200 times every year with abuse-related issues. The costs of the calls are covered by the NANE Association with help from tenders to maintain the helpline, as well as other resources (e.g. donations) so that it does not cost anything for the callers. The volunteers of the Association deal with every form of violence against women, be it emotional, verbal, physical, sexual, or economic abuse. The helpline offers the first step to effectively handle violence against women: a supportive conversation that helps the caller become conscious of the issue and provides them with information. The aim of these conversations is to map out what the caller wants and what their resources are, as well as to bust the misconceptions and myths around the issue of gender-based violence, often shared by victims as well. The helpline can be called anonymously, as battered women are often stigmatised both by their immediate environment and wider society, which causes a sense of shame that may prevent them from seeking help.

The trained volunteers of the NANE helpline are aware of the social backgrounds of violence, do not blame the victims, and they believe the callers. We know that violence (be it emotional, verbal, physical, sexual, or economic) is still violence, even if the perpetrator is unknown or if the attack takes place in a public space. We know that perpetrators can be rich and influential as well, and that violence does not occur exclusively under coercion or death threats. In the cases of sexual violence and harassment, we believe that the influence of alcohol or drug use does not mean consent, and neither does the fact that the victim accepted a drink or went to the perpetrator’s home.

Only the perpetrator is responsible for the violence, never the victim.

The necessity of the helpline

In Hungary, even the most conservative estimates say that at least one woman dies because of domestic violence every week: her husband, ex-husband, or partner, ex-partner kills her. This means at least 52 women gets killed every year because of domestic violence.

According to European and Hungarian statistics, every fifth woman is regularly abused physically by her partner. In Hungary, this means about half a million women and almost as many male perpetrators.

As for the number of battered children, we can only guess. There are hundreds of thousands of children in Hungary who are victims of physical, emotional, or sexual abuse committed by a relative. It is also considered child abuse if a child itself does not experience physical violence but lives under circumstances where the father abuses the mother.

Battered women ask the police for help an average of eight times. (Our experiences suggest that often they do so in vain, as the police’s excuse is that they can act only if “blood spills,” or they fail to go on-site or neglect in any other way to act according to the regulations and operative rules set by the national police.)

1447 Budapest, PO Box. 502.
info@nane.hu

This website was created with the generous support of Norway Grants.